2048 – The Excel Version

You may have heard about the recent viral game 2048 by Gabriele Cirulli. It’s a perfect blend of addictive and frustrating. It’s a simple game where you match 2-like numbers placed next to each other to create a new tile of their sums. The goal is to get a tile of the value 2048.

2048 Screenshot

Well now there is a version playable entirely in Microsoft Excel! Co-developed by Peter Bartholomew and Petros Chatzipantazis, they bring all the fun of 2048 to a spreadsheet! You can download the excel version of 2048 for free here! The VBA is all open source so if you’re an advanced Excel wizard, have a look at the code to see how this all came together.

Candy Number Crunch Saga Released!

Candy Number Crunch Saga is a stock trading simulation game that runs entirely in Microsoft Excel!

New Game

Candy Number Crunch Saga takes place in the not too distant future where King.com (KING) has had a successful IPO. The burden is on you, brave stock trader, to invest wisely and become richer beyond your wildest dreams!

Key Features:

  • Over 35 unique (and sometimes wacky) news events that impact the stock price. Every game is different!
  • Realistic stock transactions.
  • A real-time stock ticker.
  • The entire game runs in a Microsoft Excel workbook.

This game was made in my spare time over the course of 4 days for Candy Jam. The game is open-source so feel free to explore the source code!

Download here: http://carywalkin.itch.io/candy-number-crunch-saga

Candy Number Crunch Saga is available on PC Excel versions 2007, 2010 and 2013. Mac Excel versions are not supported.

Canadian Technological Achievement of the Year

So this is a very nice New Years Eve surprise!

From The Globe and Mail:

In a year that saw BlackBerry’s fortunes take yet another turn for the worse, it was often easy to feel pessimistic about the state of technological innovation in Canada. Fortunately for us, people like Cary Walkin exist.

Mr. Walkin, a chartered accountant, decided to build a dungeon-crawler role-playing video game all by himself. Now, this on its own would be a fairly impressive endeavour. But no, Mr. Walkin took things a step further by building this video game entirely within the confines of Microsoft Excel.

Now you may ask: Could Mr. Walkin have spent his time and ample talent doing something more worthwhile than building a video game using only spreadsheet macros? We say no. Keep on fighting the good fight, Cary.

Arena.Xlsm Animations Early Preview

I was going to hold off on uploading this until I had more animations in the game but I felt the desire to share. So this is a early preview of what will be coming in the future. Please forgive the choppiness and lack of audio, in the future I will use better screen capture software.

VBA4Play: Making a Maze (Part 1: Your First Maze)

This post has been written by guest author Jordan Goldmeier of Option Explicit VBA

Disclaimer: The following tutorial requires Conditional Formatting which is a feature of Excel 2010 and greater. If you are using an older version of Excel, please note that formatting will not work correctly for you.

This article is part of a series called “VBA4Play”, written in conjunction with Excel game developer, Cary Walkin, for his blog. Many thanks to Cary for inviting me to write a few tutorials for his series.

This post is a continuation of my first post for Cary Walkin’s VBA4Play series, Development Principles for Excel Games and Applications, and Cary’s first post, VBA4Play Part 1: Movement and Collision Detection. If you have not read either of these posts, I strongly suggest you read them before moving forward.

Today, we’ll be focusing on how you can turn regions of your spreadsheet into a map for a game. This will be similar to the illuminated pathway featured in the bottom-right of the spreadsheet maze shown below.

Maze

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VBA4Play: Making a Maze (Prologue: Development Principles for Excel Games and Applications)

This post has been written by guest author Jordan Goldmeier of Option Explicit VBA

This is part of a series called “VBA4Play,” written in conjunction with Excel game developer, Cary Walkin, for his blog. Many thanks to Cary for inviting me to write a few tutorials for his series.

My development approach is different from Cary’s. To be sure, there are many different development styles when in comes to Excel and, for that matter, in the software development world. However, my principles are ones I hold fast to. You may disagree with them, and I welcome you to challenge me in the comments should you feel inclined. But it’s far more important that you understand these principles and why I believe in them. Think of it as an Elements of Style for Excel development. (For the unfamiliar, The Elements of Style is English style guide with a list of rules and principles to English writing style.)

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Molyjam 2013: Observations From a First-Timer

Last weekend I attended Molyjam, a game jam event hosted by Uken Games in Toronto. A game jam is an event where people volunteer to work on a game for a weekend and see what they can make by the end of the weekend. For me, the end result was Lost Dog, a 4-player marco-polo experience where you are trying to find your lost dog before a coyote finds it first (Play in Browser). The game was made over the weekend with contributions from myself, Aaron Bernstein, Katherine Mackay, Edith Chow, and Ryan Roth. This was my first game jam event and this post details my observations about it.

Lost Dog – Molyjam

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